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nutraMetrix Isotonix® Multivitamin

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  • Helps contribute to a healthy pregnancy
  • Provides vitamins and minerals essential for normal growth and development of the baby
  • Helps maintain normal blood pressure during pregnancy
  • Contains activated forms of select B vitamins to ensure optimal utilization by the body
  • Healthful diets containing adequate folate may reduce a woman’s risk of having a child with a brain or spinal cord defect
  • 0.8 mg folic acid in a dietary supplement is more effective in reducing the risk of neural tube defects than a lower amount in foods in common form. FDA does not endorse this claim. Public health authorities recommend that women consume 0.4 mg folic acid daily from fortified foods or dietary supplements or both to reduce the risk of neural tube defects.
  • Helps promote a healthy birth weight of the baby
  • Deficiencies of micronutrients (zinc, iron, folic acid and iodine) during pregnancy are known causes of low birth weight
  • Meets the increased requirement for certain vitamins and minerals during pregnancy
  • Helps maintain healthy skin and hair

 

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Beta-Carotene (Vitamin A Precursor) 4,000 IU
Optimal vitamin A intake is advisable during the pre-conception period before pregnancy. Adequate amounts of vitamin A help to promote the health of the baby by promoting normal growth and development of the embryo and fetus, and supporting genes that determine the sequential development of organs in embryonic development. Beta-carotene is a nutrient from plants that the body converts into vitamin A.

Vitamin B1 3 mg
Vitamin B1 is a water-soluble vitamin that supports the body’s ability to process carbohydrates, fat, and protein. Every cell of the body utilizes B1 to support the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel the body uses to function. Nerve cells require vitamin B1 in order to function normally. Since energy requirements and production increase in pregnancy, the RDAs for these vitamins also increase.

Vitamin B2 3 mg
Vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin that promotes the body’s ability to process amino acids and fats, activate vitamin B6 and folic acid, and support the normal conversion of carbohydrates into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel the body uses to function. Vitamin B2 promotes energy production and since energy production increases in pregnancy, the RDAs for these vitamins also increase.

Niacin 20 mg
Niacin promotes normal energy production. Vitamin B3 works with vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 to support the release of energy from carbohydrates. Since energy production increases in pregnancy, the RDAs for these vitamins also increase.

Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5)10 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) is a water-soluble vitamin involved in the Kreb’s cycle of energy production and promotes the normal production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. When the nerve impulse originating in the brain arrives at the nerve ending, it releases a chemical called acetylcholine and assists in the neurodevelopment of the baby. Pantothenic acid works together with vitamin B1, vitamin B2, and vitamin B3 to support the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel our body uses to function. Vitamin B5 also supports normal producing, transporting, and releasing of energy from fats. It helps to regulate your body's adrenal activity and antibody production. If you're pregnant and don't get enough B5, your baby's growth may be slowed.

Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate (Vitamin B6) 4 mg
Vitamin B6 is the master vitamin for processing amino acids — the building blocks of all proteins and some hormones. Vitamin B6 supports the production and breakdown of many amino acids and also promotes the production of the hormones serotonin, melatonin, and dopamine, which is vital to your fetus's developing brain and nervous system.

Methylcobalamin (Vitamin B12) 12 mcg

Methylcobalamin is one of the naturally-occurring forms of vitamin B12 found in the human body. The liver must convert cyanocobalamin, the form of B12 most commonly used in supplements, into methylcobalamin, before it can be properly utilized by the body; methylcobalamin is more effective than non-active forms of vitamin B12. Methylcobalamin also promotes the normal formation of SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine), a nutrient that has powerful mood-elevating properties.

 

When consumed during pregnancy, vitamin B12 promotes the health and normal nerve function of the baby.

 

Vitamin B12 is a bacterial product naturally found in animal products, especially organ meats, such as liver, with small amounts derived from peanuts and fermented soy products, such as miso and tempeh. It is essential that vegetarians consume a vitamin B12 supplement to maintain optimal health. Vitamin B12, when ingested, is stored in the liver and other tissues for later use. It supports the maintenance of cells, especially those of the nervous system, bone marrow and intestinal tract. Vitamin B12 promotes normal homocysteine metabolism (homocysteine is an amino acid that is formed within the body). Normal homocysteine levels are important for maintaining cardiovascular health. Deficiencies of the vitamins folic acid, pyridoxine (B6) or cobalamin (B12) can result in elevated levels of homocysteine. Folate and B12, in their active coenzyme form, are both necessary cofactors for the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, thus helping to maintain healthy blood levels of homocysteine.

 

Folic Acid (Calcium Folinate) 800 mcg
Folic acid is mainly found in fruits and vegetables. Dark, leafy greens, oranges, orange juice, beans, peas and brewer’s yeast are the best sources. Folic acid plays a key role by boosting the benefits of B12 supplementation. These two B vitamins join forces and work together in maintaining normal red blood cells. Folic acid assists in the normal utilization of amino acids and proteins, as well as supporting the construction of the material for DNA and RNA synthesis, which is necessary for all bodily functions. Scientific studies have found that when working in tandem with folic acid, B12 is capable of promoting normal homocysteine levels. This works toward supporting a healthy cardiovascular and nervous system.*


Biotin 300 mcg
Biotin, a water-soluble B vitamin, acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of protein, fats and carbohydrates. Women have an increased requirement for biotin during pregnancy, and a biotin deficiency may occur in as many as 50 percent of pregnant women, and this deficiency may increase the risk of birth defects.

 

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) 120 mg
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that has a number of biological functions. It promotes normal tissue repair and healing. Additionally, vitamin C also supports your immune system. The female body's requirement for vitamin C increases during pregnancy as this vitamin promotes the normal growth of the baby and supports building strong bones and teeth. It also supports absorption of another key nutrient during pregnancy, iron.

 

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) 1000 IU
Women have an increased requirement for vitamin D during pregnancy. The main function of vitamin D is to promote the normal regulation of serum calcium concentrations. Vitamin D enhances the intestinal absorption of calcium, primarily in the duodenum and jejunum by supporting the synthesis of calcium-binding proteins to promote healthy calcium absorption and retention.

 

Vitamin E (D-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) 30 IU
Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin proven to be a strong antioxidant and is absorbed by the mother and transported to the fetus. It promotes structural and functional maintenance of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It also supports the formation of red blood cells, promotes healthy cardiovascular function and enhances the immune system.

 

Calcium (Lactate) 300 mg
Another important nutrient in an expectant mother’s diet is calcium. Calcium needs increase significantly during pregnancy. Healthy levels of calcium during pregnancy may help the mother maintain normal blood pressure and water balance during pregnancy. Low dietary intake of calcium is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia (pregnancy-induced hypertension, urine protein loss and swelling around the ankles). A substantial transfer of calcium occurs between the mother and the fetus throughout pregnancy, allowing the baby's bone and teeth formation. In the first six months, the mother stores up calcium in her own bones. When its skeletal growth reaches its peak in the last three months, the fetus draws on the mother's calcium storage. This is when the consumption of high calcium-containing foods, such as milk and milk products must be increased, since a calcium deficiency could harm the mother's teeth and bones.

Copper (Gluconate) 2 mg
Copper is an essential trace element present both in the diet and in the human body. It promotes the normal absorption and utilization of iron. It is also part of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD). Copper promotes the normal creation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy the body uses to function. Copper promotes normal infant development, red and white blood cell maturation, iron transport, bone strength, cholesterol metabolism, myocardial contractility, glucose metabolism, brain development and immune function.

Iron 20 mg
Iron is an important mineral found in prenatal vitamins, and is responsible for helping the mother and the baby’s blood to carry oxygen. Iron deficiencies can lead to severe birth defects for the baby. As an essential mineral, iron is part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of the blood. The demand for iron, essential for blood formation, is also significantly increased during pregnancy because the mother's blood volume increases, and the fetal red blood cells have to be developed. In order to support fetal tissue growth, blood volume and contents must grow to help feed these tissues, including red blood cells. Further, about one-third of the mother’s iron storage will be passed on to her developing baby in order to form its blood and to be stored for future use.

Magnesium (Carbonate) 200 mg
Magnesium, an essential mineral, promotes normal bone, protein, and fatty acid formation, cell formation, activation of B vitamins, muscle relaxation, blood clotting, and formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the energy the body runs on). Magnesium promotes the health of bones (64 percent of the body's magnesium is concentrated in the bones). It supports normal bone structure and plays an essential role in more than 300 cellular reactions. Magnesium may help maintain normal blood pressure and muscle comfort during pregnancy. 

 

Zinc (Lactate) 15 mg
Zinc is an essential mineral that is a component of more than 300 enzymes that support normal healing, fertility in adults and growth in children, protein synthesis, cell reproduction, vision, immune function, and protection against free radicals, among other functions. Zinc supports normal growth and development during pregnancy.  

Molybdenum (Sodium molybdate) 50 mcg
Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral that supports the proper function of certain enzyme-dependent processes, including the metabolism of iron, which is extremely important for pregnant women.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

  • Ryan-Harshman M et al. Folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects. Canadian Family Physician. 54(1):36-8, 2008.
  • Czeizel A et al. Dose-dependent effect of folic acid on the prevention of orofacial clefts. Pediatrics. 104(6):e66, 1999.
  • Ren A et al. Comparison of blood folate levels among pregnant Chinese women in areas with high and low prevalence of neural tube defects. Public Health Nutrition. 10(8):762-8, 2007.
  • Brent R et al. Further efforts to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects. Pediatrics. 119(1):225-6, 2007.
  • Lindsey L et al. Understanding optimal nutrition among women of childbearing age in the United States and Puerto Rico: employing formative research to lay the foundation for national birth defects prevention campaigns. Journal of Health Communication. 12(8):733-57, 2007.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Wald N et al. Quantifying the effect of folic acid. Lancet. 358(9298):2069-2073, 2001.
  • Locksmith G et al. Preventing neural tube defects: the importance periconceptional folic acid supplements. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 321(7):1027-1034, 1998.
  • Suarez L et al. Maternal serum B(12) levels and risk for neural tube defects in a Texas-Mexico border population. Annals of Epidemiology. 13(2):81-88, 2003.
  • Candito M et al. Nutritional and genetic determinants of vitamin B and homocysteine metabolisms in neural tube defects: a multicenter case-control study. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(9):1128-33, 2008.
  • Boyles A et al. Folate and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and their associations with oral facial clefts. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(4):440-9, 2008.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prevalence of neural tube defects and folic acid knowledge and consumption--Puerto Rico, 1996-2006. MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 57(1):10-3, 2008.
  • Wilson R et al. Pre-conceptional vitamin/folic acid supplementation 2007: the use of folic acid in combination with a multivitamin supplement for the prevention of neural tube defects and other congenital anomalies. Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology Canada. 29(12):1003-26, 2007.
  • Gupta P et al. Multimicronutrient supplementation for undernourished pregnant women and the birth size of their offspring: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. 161(1):58-64, 2007.
  • Scholl T et al. Vitamin E: maternal concentrations are associated with fetal growth. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 84(6):1442-8, 2006.
  • Kaiser L et al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(3):553-61, 2008.
  • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatrics Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
  • Pathak P et al. Prevalence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies amongst pregnant women in a rural area of Haryana. Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 71(11):1007-14, 2004. Review.
  • Castillo-Durán C et al. Zinc supplementation and growth of the fetus and low birth weight infant. Journal of Nutrition. 133(5 Suppl 1):1494S-7S, 2003. Review.
  • Wynn A and Wynn M. Magnesium and other nutrient deficiencies as possible causes of hypertension and low birth weight. Nutrition and Health. 6(2):69-88, 1988. Review.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Grant W et al. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review. Alternative Medicine Review. 10(2):94-111, 2005.
  • Zagré N et al. Prenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation has greater impact on birth weight than supplementation with iron and folic acid: a cluster-randomized, double-blind, controlled programmatic study in rural Niger. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 28(3):317-27, 2007.
  • Hernandez-Diaz S et al. Risk of gestational hypertension in relation to folic acid supplementation during pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(9):806-812, 2002.
  • Wen S et al. Folic acid supplementation in early second trimester and the risk of preeclampsia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 198(1):45.e1-7, 2008.
  • Bodnar L et al. Maternal vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of preeclampsia. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 92(9):3517-22, 2007.
  • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatrics Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
  • Repke J. Calcium, magnesium, and zinc supplementation and perinatal outcome. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 34(2):262-7, 1991. Review.
  • Wynn A and Wynn M. Magnesium and other nutrient deficiencies as possible causes of hypertension and low birthweight. Nutrition and Health. 6(2):69-88, 1988. Review.
  • Altura B et al. Magnesium deficiency-induced spasms of umbilical vessels: relation to preeclampsia, hypertension, growth retardation. Science. 221(4608):376-8, 1983.
  • Hofmeyr G et al. Calcium supplementation to prevent pre-eclampsia--a systematic review. South African Medical Journal. 93(3):224-228, 2003.
  • Coetzee E et al. A randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium sulphate versus placebo in the management of women with severe pre-clampsia. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 105(3):300, 1998.
  • Hypponen E. Vitamin D for the prevention of preeclampsia? A hypothesis. Nutrition Reviews. 63(7):225-232, 2005.
  • Chappell L et al. Vitamin C and E supplementation in women at risk of preeclampsia is associated with changes in indices of oxidative stress and placental function. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 187(3):777-784, 2002.
  • Chappell L et al. Effect of antioxidants on the occurrence of pre-eclampsia in women at increased risk: a randomized trial. Lancet. 354(9181):810-816, 1999.
  • Vaidya A, et al. Effects of antenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation on children’s weight and size at 2 years of age in Nepal: follow-up of a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Lancet. 371(9611):492-9, 2008.
  • Wilcox A et al. Folic acid supplements and risk of facial clefts: national population based case-control study. British Medical Journal. 334(7591):464, 2007.
  • Shaw G et al. Risks of orofacial clefts in children born to women using multivitamins containing folic acid periconceptionally. Lancet. 346(8972):393-6, 1995.
  • Goh Y et al. Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of congenital anomalies: a meta-analysis. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada. 28(8):680-9, 2006. Review.
  • Lindsey L et al. Understanding optimal nutrition among women of childbearing age in the United States and Puerto Rico: employing formative research to lay the foundation for national birth defects prevention campaigns. Journal of Health Communication. 12(8):733-57, 2007.
  • Goh Y et al. Prenatal supplementation with multivitamins and the incidence of pediatric cancers: clinical and methodological considerations. Pediatrics Blood and Cancer. 50(2 Suppl):487-9; discussion 498, 2008. Review.
  • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatric Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
  • Czeizel A et al. Dose-dependent effect of folic acid on the prevention of orofacial clefts. Pediatrics. 104(6):e66, 1999.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Czeizel A et al. Maternal use of nutritional supplements during the first month of pregnancy and decreased risk of Down's syndrome: case-control study. Nutrition. 21(6):698-704, 2005.
  • Thomson K et al. Postnatal evaluation of vitamin D and bone health in women who were vitamin D-deficient in pregnancy, and in their infants. The Medical Journal of Australia. 181(9):486-8, 2004.
  • Merialdi M et al. Adding zinc to prenatal iron and folate tablets improves fetal neurobehavioral development. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 180(2 Partt 1):483-490, 1999.
  • Merialdi M et al. Randomized controlled trial of prenatal zinc supplementation and fetal bone growth. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 79(5):826-830, 2004.
  • Boyles A et al. Folate and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and their associations with oral facial clefts. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(4):440-9, 2008.
  • Morin P et al. Multivitamin supplement for primary prevention of birth defects: application of a preventive clinical practice. Canadian Family Physician. 53(12):2142-3, 2007.
  • Mock D et al. Marginal biotin deficiency during normal pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 75(2):295-299, 2002.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Klenner F et al. Observations on the dose and administration of ascorbic acid when employed beyond the range of a vitamin in human pathology. Journal of Applied Nutrition. 23(3-4), 1971.
  • Grant W et al. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review. Alternative Medicine Review. 10(2):94-111, 2005.
  • Hollis B. Vitamin D requirement during pregnancy and lactation. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 22 Suppl 2:V39-44, 2007. Review.
  • Kaiser L et al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(3):553-61, 2008.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin is an isotonic-capable supplement that delivers metabolically active forms of folic acid and other B-vitamins, in addition to supplying the Recommended Daily Allowance of key vitamins and nutrients needed for an expectant mother. Taking a prenatal multivitamin with the activated forms of vitamins and minerals is important, especially to pregnant women, because it reduces the amount of effort required to activate and use the nutrients. The superior Isotonix delivery system and the activated forms of essential B-vitamins in Isotonix Prenatal Multivitamin provides pregnant women with superior multivitamin benefits without the difficulty of swallowing prenatal tablets.

Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin contributes to a healthy pregnancy, and supports normal growth and development of a healthy baby. It also promotes a healthy birth weight and helps maintain normal blood pressure during pregnancy. Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin tastes great and has a soothing, lemon-lime flavor.*

Isotonic, which means “same pressure,” bears the same chemical resemblance of the body’s blood, plasma and tears. All fluids in the body have a certain concentration, referred to as osmotic pressure. The body’s common osmotic pressure, which is isotonic, allows a consistent maintenance of body tissues. In order for a substance to be absorbed and used in the body’s metabolism, it must be transported in an isotonic state.

Isotonix dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic solution. This means that the body has less work to do in obtaining maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass directly into the small intestine and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With Isotonix products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

What are prenatal vitamins?
Prenatal vitamins are specially formulated multivitamins that make up for any nutritional deficiencies in the mother's diet during pregnancy. While they contain numerous vitamins and minerals, their folic acid, iron and calcium content are especially important.*

Why do pregnant women need high levels of folic acid, iron, and calcium?
Folic acid promotes the development of the fetal central nervous system and healthful diets containing adequate folic acid may reduce a woman’s risk of having a child with a brain or spinal cord defect. Folic acid is a B vitamin that promotes normal cell replication and growth. Natural sources of folic acid include green, leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and citrus fruits. It is also found in many fortified breakfast cereals and some vitamin supplements. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy may help an expectant mother maintain her own bone density as the fetus requires calcium for optimal bone growth. Iron helps both the mother and baby's blood carry oxygen. While a daily vitamin supplement is no substitute for a healthy diet, most women need supplements to make sure they get adequate levels of these minerals.* 

How long should I take prenatal vitamins?
Isotonix Prenatal can be taken for the duration of your pregnancy. You can also continue taking a prenatal after pregnancy due to its beneficial vitamin and mineral content.*

What are the “activated” ingredients in Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin?
Activated refers to the active forms of vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid. Using forms other than these activated forms requires that the vitamins be enzymatically activated prior to utilization by the body. Not only does this take time and energy within an expectant mother’s body, there are circumstances in which this reaction is either slowed or inhibited.*

Why is the activated form of folic acid important for pregnant women?
Folic acid is essential for healthy development of the brain stem and spinal cord in unborn children. Pregnant women are able to receive the benefits of folic acid immediately when it is taken in its metabolically active state.* 

Why should I take a vitamin-mineral supplement during pregnancy?
Eating a wide variety of healthy foods is very important, but with morning sickness, busy schedules and the changing nutritional demands of the developing baby, it can be difficult to achieve adequate nutritional intake. Regardless of any irregular eating habits during pregnancy, prenatal vitamins are specially formulated to make certain that the mother and her baby receive the right amount of nutrients. With the substantial increased needs for iron, folic acid and calcium during this time, a prenatal vitamin is essential.*

My prenatal vitamin makes me nauseous. What should I do?
Some prenatal vitamins can cause nausea in an already nauseous pregnant woman. If your prenatal vitamins make you sick, talk to your health care provider.

Should I take Isotonix Prenatal only during the first months of pregnancy and toward the end of my pregnancy, or continuously throughout my pregnancy?
It is recommended to take Isotonix Prenatal throughout your entire pregnancy. Vitamins and minerals are needed at different stages of your pregnancy, and for different purposes. For example, multivitamins containing folic acid are crucial before and during pregnancy. Recent studies suggest that a multivitamin containing folic acid may also help maintain normal blood pressure and fluid balance.* 

There is only 300 mg of calcium in Isotonix Prenatal; should I take any additional calcium?
It is recommended that pregnant women consume 1,000 milligrams of calcium each day to keep your bones and teeth strong, and for your baby's developing bones. Consuming at least three servings of calcium-rich dairy products daily will support a healthy calcium intake.*

Are there any warnings associated with Isotonix Prenatal?
Pregnant or breastfeeding women should consult a healthcare professional before using this or any dietary supplement. Also, keep out of reach of children. This product contains iron, which an accidental overdose of iron containing supplements is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under six.

Is this product vegetarian friendly?
Yes. Isotonix Prenatal is a vegetarian product.

How do I take Isotonix Prenatal?
Take your Isotonix Prenatal daily, following the directions of your health care provider or the directions on the label. The recommended daily serving is 6.6 grams, which is two capfuls. 

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

  • Helps contribute to a healthy pregnancy
  • Provides vitamins and minerals essential for normal growth and development of the baby
  • Helps maintain normal blood pressure during pregnancy
  • Contains activated forms of select B vitamins to ensure optimal utilization by the body
  • Healthful diets containing adequate folate may reduce a woman’s risk of having a child with a brain or spinal cord defect
  • 0.8 mg folic acid in a dietary supplement is more effective in reducing the risk of neural tube defects than a lower amount in foods in common form. FDA does not endorse this claim. Public health authorities recommend that women consume 0.4 mg folic acid daily from fortified foods or dietary supplements or both to reduce the risk of neural tube defects.
  • Helps promote a healthy birth weight of the baby
  • Deficiencies of micronutrients (zinc, iron, folic acid and iodine) during pregnancy are known causes of low birth weight
  • Meets the increased requirement for certain vitamins and minerals during pregnancy
  • Helps maintain healthy skin and hair

 



Beta-Carotene (Vitamin A Precursor) 4,000 IU
Optimal vitamin A intake is advisable during the pre-conception period before pregnancy. Adequate amounts of vitamin A help to promote the health of the baby by promoting normal growth and development of the embryo and fetus, and supporting genes that determine the sequential development of organs in embryonic development. Beta-carotene is a nutrient from plants that the body converts into vitamin A.

Vitamin B1 3 mg
Vitamin B1 is a water-soluble vitamin that supports the body’s ability to process carbohydrates, fat, and protein. Every cell of the body utilizes B1 to support the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel the body uses to function. Nerve cells require vitamin B1 in order to function normally. Since energy requirements and production increase in pregnancy, the RDAs for these vitamins also increase.

Vitamin B2 3 mg
Vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin that promotes the body’s ability to process amino acids and fats, activate vitamin B6 and folic acid, and support the normal conversion of carbohydrates into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel the body uses to function. Vitamin B2 promotes energy production and since energy production increases in pregnancy, the RDAs for these vitamins also increase.

Niacin 20 mg
Niacin promotes normal energy production. Vitamin B3 works with vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 to support the release of energy from carbohydrates. Since energy production increases in pregnancy, the RDAs for these vitamins also increase.

Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5)10 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) is a water-soluble vitamin involved in the Kreb’s cycle of energy production and promotes the normal production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. When the nerve impulse originating in the brain arrives at the nerve ending, it releases a chemical called acetylcholine and assists in the neurodevelopment of the baby. Pantothenic acid works together with vitamin B1, vitamin B2, and vitamin B3 to support the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel our body uses to function. Vitamin B5 also supports normal producing, transporting, and releasing of energy from fats. It helps to regulate your body's adrenal activity and antibody production. If you're pregnant and don't get enough B5, your baby's growth may be slowed.

Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate (Vitamin B6) 4 mg
Vitamin B6 is the master vitamin for processing amino acids — the building blocks of all proteins and some hormones. Vitamin B6 supports the production and breakdown of many amino acids and also promotes the production of the hormones serotonin, melatonin, and dopamine, which is vital to your fetus's developing brain and nervous system.

Methylcobalamin (Vitamin B12) 12 mcg

Methylcobalamin is one of the naturally-occurring forms of vitamin B12 found in the human body. The liver must convert cyanocobalamin, the form of B12 most commonly used in supplements, into methylcobalamin, before it can be properly utilized by the body; methylcobalamin is more effective than non-active forms of vitamin B12. Methylcobalamin also promotes the normal formation of SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine), a nutrient that has powerful mood-elevating properties.

 

When consumed during pregnancy, vitamin B12 promotes the health and normal nerve function of the baby.

 

Vitamin B12 is a bacterial product naturally found in animal products, especially organ meats, such as liver, with small amounts derived from peanuts and fermented soy products, such as miso and tempeh. It is essential that vegetarians consume a vitamin B12 supplement to maintain optimal health. Vitamin B12, when ingested, is stored in the liver and other tissues for later use. It supports the maintenance of cells, especially those of the nervous system, bone marrow and intestinal tract. Vitamin B12 promotes normal homocysteine metabolism (homocysteine is an amino acid that is formed within the body). Normal homocysteine levels are important for maintaining cardiovascular health. Deficiencies of the vitamins folic acid, pyridoxine (B6) or cobalamin (B12) can result in elevated levels of homocysteine. Folate and B12, in their active coenzyme form, are both necessary cofactors for the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, thus helping to maintain healthy blood levels of homocysteine.

 

Folic Acid (Calcium Folinate) 800 mcg
Folic acid is mainly found in fruits and vegetables. Dark, leafy greens, oranges, orange juice, beans, peas and brewer’s yeast are the best sources. Folic acid plays a key role by boosting the benefits of B12 supplementation. These two B vitamins join forces and work together in maintaining normal red blood cells. Folic acid assists in the normal utilization of amino acids and proteins, as well as supporting the construction of the material for DNA and RNA synthesis, which is necessary for all bodily functions. Scientific studies have found that when working in tandem with folic acid, B12 is capable of promoting normal homocysteine levels. This works toward supporting a healthy cardiovascular and nervous system.*


Biotin 300 mcg
Biotin, a water-soluble B vitamin, acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of protein, fats and carbohydrates. Women have an increased requirement for biotin during pregnancy, and a biotin deficiency may occur in as many as 50 percent of pregnant women, and this deficiency may increase the risk of birth defects.

 

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) 120 mg
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that has a number of biological functions. It promotes normal tissue repair and healing. Additionally, vitamin C also supports your immune system. The female body's requirement for vitamin C increases during pregnancy as this vitamin promotes the normal growth of the baby and supports building strong bones and teeth. It also supports absorption of another key nutrient during pregnancy, iron.

 

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) 1000 IU
Women have an increased requirement for vitamin D during pregnancy. The main function of vitamin D is to promote the normal regulation of serum calcium concentrations. Vitamin D enhances the intestinal absorption of calcium, primarily in the duodenum and jejunum by supporting the synthesis of calcium-binding proteins to promote healthy calcium absorption and retention.

 

Vitamin E (D-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) 30 IU
Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin proven to be a strong antioxidant and is absorbed by the mother and transported to the fetus. It promotes structural and functional maintenance of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It also supports the formation of red blood cells, promotes healthy cardiovascular function and enhances the immune system.

 

Calcium (Lactate) 300 mg
Another important nutrient in an expectant mother’s diet is calcium. Calcium needs increase significantly during pregnancy. Healthy levels of calcium during pregnancy may help the mother maintain normal blood pressure and water balance during pregnancy. Low dietary intake of calcium is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia (pregnancy-induced hypertension, urine protein loss and swelling around the ankles). A substantial transfer of calcium occurs between the mother and the fetus throughout pregnancy, allowing the baby's bone and teeth formation. In the first six months, the mother stores up calcium in her own bones. When its skeletal growth reaches its peak in the last three months, the fetus draws on the mother's calcium storage. This is when the consumption of high calcium-containing foods, such as milk and milk products must be increased, since a calcium deficiency could harm the mother's teeth and bones.

Copper (Gluconate) 2 mg
Copper is an essential trace element present both in the diet and in the human body. It promotes the normal absorption and utilization of iron. It is also part of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD). Copper promotes the normal creation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy the body uses to function. Copper promotes normal infant development, red and white blood cell maturation, iron transport, bone strength, cholesterol metabolism, myocardial contractility, glucose metabolism, brain development and immune function.

Iron 20 mg
Iron is an important mineral found in prenatal vitamins, and is responsible for helping the mother and the baby’s blood to carry oxygen. Iron deficiencies can lead to severe birth defects for the baby. As an essential mineral, iron is part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of the blood. The demand for iron, essential for blood formation, is also significantly increased during pregnancy because the mother's blood volume increases, and the fetal red blood cells have to be developed. In order to support fetal tissue growth, blood volume and contents must grow to help feed these tissues, including red blood cells. Further, about one-third of the mother’s iron storage will be passed on to her developing baby in order to form its blood and to be stored for future use.

Magnesium (Carbonate) 200 mg
Magnesium, an essential mineral, promotes normal bone, protein, and fatty acid formation, cell formation, activation of B vitamins, muscle relaxation, blood clotting, and formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the energy the body runs on). Magnesium promotes the health of bones (64 percent of the body's magnesium is concentrated in the bones). It supports normal bone structure and plays an essential role in more than 300 cellular reactions. Magnesium may help maintain normal blood pressure and muscle comfort during pregnancy. 

 

Zinc (Lactate) 15 mg
Zinc is an essential mineral that is a component of more than 300 enzymes that support normal healing, fertility in adults and growth in children, protein synthesis, cell reproduction, vision, immune function, and protection against free radicals, among other functions. Zinc supports normal growth and development during pregnancy.  

Molybdenum (Sodium molybdate) 50 mcg
Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral that supports the proper function of certain enzyme-dependent processes, including the metabolism of iron, which is extremely important for pregnant women.



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Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin is an isotonic-capable supplement that delivers metabolically active forms of folic acid and other B-vitamins, in addition to supplying the Recommended Daily Allowance of key vitamins and nutrients needed for an expectant mother. Taking a prenatal multivitamin with the activated forms of vitamins and minerals is important, especially to pregnant women, because it reduces the amount of effort required to activate and use the nutrients. The superior Isotonix delivery system and the activated forms of essential B-vitamins in Isotonix Prenatal Multivitamin provides pregnant women with superior multivitamin benefits without the difficulty of swallowing prenatal tablets.

Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin contributes to a healthy pregnancy, and supports normal growth and development of a healthy baby. It also promotes a healthy birth weight and helps maintain normal blood pressure during pregnancy. Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin tastes great and has a soothing, lemon-lime flavor.*

Isotonic, which means “same pressure,” bears the same chemical resemblance of the body’s blood, plasma and tears. All fluids in the body have a certain concentration, referred to as osmotic pressure. The body’s common osmotic pressure, which is isotonic, allows a consistent maintenance of body tissues. In order for a substance to be absorbed and used in the body’s metabolism, it must be transported in an isotonic state.

Isotonix dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic solution. This means that the body has less work to do in obtaining maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass directly into the small intestine and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With Isotonix products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.



What are prenatal vitamins?
Prenatal vitamins are specially formulated multivitamins that make up for any nutritional deficiencies in the mother's diet during pregnancy. While they contain numerous vitamins and minerals, their folic acid, iron and calcium content are especially important.*

Why do pregnant women need high levels of folic acid, iron, and calcium?
Folic acid promotes the development of the fetal central nervous system and healthful diets containing adequate folic acid may reduce a woman’s risk of having a child with a brain or spinal cord defect. Folic acid is a B vitamin that promotes normal cell replication and growth. Natural sources of folic acid include green, leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and citrus fruits. It is also found in many fortified breakfast cereals and some vitamin supplements. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy may help an expectant mother maintain her own bone density as the fetus requires calcium for optimal bone growth. Iron helps both the mother and baby's blood carry oxygen. While a daily vitamin supplement is no substitute for a healthy diet, most women need supplements to make sure they get adequate levels of these minerals.* 

How long should I take prenatal vitamins?
Isotonix Prenatal can be taken for the duration of your pregnancy. You can also continue taking a prenatal after pregnancy due to its beneficial vitamin and mineral content.*

What are the “activated” ingredients in Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin?
Activated refers to the active forms of vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid. Using forms other than these activated forms requires that the vitamins be enzymatically activated prior to utilization by the body. Not only does this take time and energy within an expectant mother’s body, there are circumstances in which this reaction is either slowed or inhibited.*

Why is the activated form of folic acid important for pregnant women?
Folic acid is essential for healthy development of the brain stem and spinal cord in unborn children. Pregnant women are able to receive the benefits of folic acid immediately when it is taken in its metabolically active state.* 

Why should I take a vitamin-mineral supplement during pregnancy?
Eating a wide variety of healthy foods is very important, but with morning sickness, busy schedules and the changing nutritional demands of the developing baby, it can be difficult to achieve adequate nutritional intake. Regardless of any irregular eating habits during pregnancy, prenatal vitamins are specially formulated to make certain that the mother and her baby receive the right amount of nutrients. With the substantial increased needs for iron, folic acid and calcium during this time, a prenatal vitamin is essential.*

My prenatal vitamin makes me nauseous. What should I do?
Some prenatal vitamins can cause nausea in an already nauseous pregnant woman. If your prenatal vitamins make you sick, talk to your health care provider.

Should I take Isotonix Prenatal only during the first months of pregnancy and toward the end of my pregnancy, or continuously throughout my pregnancy?
It is recommended to take Isotonix Prenatal throughout your entire pregnancy. Vitamins and minerals are needed at different stages of your pregnancy, and for different purposes. For example, multivitamins containing folic acid are crucial before and during pregnancy. Recent studies suggest that a multivitamin containing folic acid may also help maintain normal blood pressure and fluid balance.* 

There is only 300 mg of calcium in Isotonix Prenatal; should I take any additional calcium?
It is recommended that pregnant women consume 1,000 milligrams of calcium each day to keep your bones and teeth strong, and for your baby's developing bones. Consuming at least three servings of calcium-rich dairy products daily will support a healthy calcium intake.*

Are there any warnings associated with Isotonix Prenatal?
Pregnant or breastfeeding women should consult a healthcare professional before using this or any dietary supplement. Also, keep out of reach of children. This product contains iron, which an accidental overdose of iron containing supplements is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under six.

Is this product vegetarian friendly?
Yes. Isotonix Prenatal is a vegetarian product.

How do I take Isotonix Prenatal?
Take your Isotonix Prenatal daily, following the directions of your health care provider or the directions on the label. The recommended daily serving is 6.6 grams, which is two capfuls. 



* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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